Vice President and Associate Provost for Undergraduate Affairs

(The Rev.) Hugh R. Page, Jr., Associate Professor of Theology and Africana Studies

Hugh Page

Hugh Page, associate professor of theology and Africana studies, was appointed vice president and associate provost for undergraduate affairs in 2013; he is also the dean of The First Year of Studies (FYS). His major responsibilities include expanding opportunities for and participation in undergraduate scholarship and research, implementing the Undergraduate Academic Code of Honor, leading the University’s enrollment management efforts by overseeing the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and the Office of Student Financial Services, and furthering campus conversation on issues related to diversity.

Page has served as the dean of FYS—the college in which all first-year Notre Dame undergraduates enroll, regardless of their intended majors—since 2005. There, his faculty is composed of full-time academic advisors who meet one-on-one with the entire class throughout the year.

Prior to assuming the leadership of FYS, Page was associate dean for undergraduate studies in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and director of the African and African American Studies Program. He was instrumental in the development of the latter into the Department of Africana Studies and is currently its chairperson.

An Episcopal priest, Page holds a bachelor’s in history from Hampton University, two master’s degrees from The General Theological Seminary in New York, a doctorate in ministry from the Graduate Theological Foundation, and a master’s and doctorate in Near Eastern languages and civilizations from Harvard University. He joined the Notre Dame faculty in 1992 and, in 2001, received a Presidential Award for distinguished service to the University.

Page’s scholarly interests include early Hebrew poetry, Africana biblical interpretation, esoterism in Africa and the African Diaspora, poetry as a medium for theological expression, and the use of religious traditions and sacred texts in the construction of individual and corporate identity in the Africana world.

He is the author or editor of Exploring New Paradigms in Biblical and Cognate Studies, The Myth of Cosmic Rebellion: A Study of its Reflexes in Ugaritic & Biblical Literature, Exodus: A Bible Commentary for Every Day, The Africana Bible: Reading Israel’s Scriptures from Africa and the African Diaspora, and Israel’s Poetry of Resistance: Africana Perspectives on Early Hebrew Verse.