News » Archives » June 2012

Notre Dame researcher’s paper examines the biology and clinical application of tumor-derived microvesicles

Author: William G. Gilroy

A new paper by Crislyn D’Souza-Schorey, professor of biological sciences at Notre Dame, discusses the biology of tumor-derived microvesicles and their clinical application as circulating biomarkers. Microvesicles are membrane-bound sacs released by tumor cells and can be detected in the body fluids of cancer patients.

Read More about Notre Dame researcher’s paper examines the biology and clinical application of tumor-derived microvesicles

Solving a fascinating puzzle

Author: Joanna Basile

Robert Goulding, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Program of Liberal Studies, was recently awarded a grant from the American Council of Learned Societies to support a research project that combines mathematics, philosophy, and Renaissance science.

Read More about Solving a fascinating puzzle

Research shows food-trade network vulnerable to fast spread of contaminants

Author: Marissa Gebhard and Rachel Fellman

Notre Dame network physicists Mária Ercsey-Ravasz and Zoltán Toroczkai, in collaboration with food science experts, have recently published a rigorous analysis of the international food-trade network that shows the network’s vulnerability to the fast spread of contaminants as well as the correlation between known food poisoning outbreaks and the centrality of countries on the network.

Read More about Research shows food-trade network vulnerable to fast spread of contaminants

Study: When highly skilled immigrants move in, highly skilled natives move out

Author:

In the first study to measure the temporary impact of highly skilled immigrants on native populations, Notre Dame economist Abigail Wozniak and Fairfield University’s Thomas J. Murray—a former Notre Dame graduate student—found that when highly skilled immigrants move to a city or town, the U.S. natives in that area who are also highly skilled tend to move away.

Read More about Study: When highly skilled immigrants move in, highly skilled natives move out