News » Archives » January 2016

Corporate philanthropy can have a positive impact on employees

Author: William G. Gilroy

Corporate philanthropy benefits organizations in many ways. But does it do anything to benefit a business’s employees? Researchers Emily Block and Michael Mannor from Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business and colleagues at Kedge Business School in France and the University of California, Los Angeles, address this question in a new study published in the Journal of Business Ethics.

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Mosquitoes capable of carrying Zika virus found in Washington, D.C.

Author: Sarah Craig and Brittany Collins

Zika virus is transmitted by the mosquito species Aedes aegypti, also a carrier of dengue fever and chikungunya, two other tropical diseases. Though Aedes aegypti is not native to North America, researchers at Notre Dame who study the species have reported a discovery of a population of the mosquitoes in a Capitol Hill neighborhood in Washington, D.C.

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Building a better phone

Author: Brendan O’Shaughnessy

Bert Hochwald, the Freimann Chair professor at the Notre Dame Wireless Institute, and his team are leading a three-year, $1.2 million investigation into how to improve the performance of cell phones while also reducing the potentially harmful radiation the phones expose our bodies to.

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Notre Dame expands its Rome program with purchase of a villa for new student residence

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Notre Dame has purchased a villa in central Rome to be used as a student residence hall for Rome Global Gateway programs. The century-old building, quite new by Roman standards, is a city block away from the headquarters of the Notre Dame program at 15 Via Ostilia in Rome’s Rione Celio neighborhood on the slopes of the Caelian Hill.

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Levi’s Stadium Networking Event

Author: David Murphy

David Murphy

I was thrilled to receive the opportunity to deliver a lecture at the new Levi's Stadium in San Francisco – an amazing venue! I chose to highlight several strategic developments at Notre Dame that have helped us advance a deep and robust entrepreneurial ecosystem and laid the foundation for high impact in California and around the world.

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Notre Dame launches initiative for better Catholic preaching

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Notre Dame’s John S. Marten Program for Homiletics and Liturgics has embarked on a unique project specifically designed to strengthen Catholic preaching. The Rev. William A. Toohey, C.S.C., Notre Dame Preaching Academy, a five-year initiative funded by the Lilly Endowment of Indianapolis, has enrolled its first cohort of 23 priest-participants from Notre Dame’s founding religious order, the Congregation of Holy Cross, as well as from the archdioceses of Indianapolis and Louisville, Kentucky, and the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana.

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Scott Merrill named 2016 Richard H. Driehaus Prize Laureate

Author: Mary Beth Zachariades

Scott Merrill, an architect known for his originality and creative application of architectural precedents, has been named the recipient of the 2016 Richard H. Driehaus Prize at the University of Notre Dame. Merrill, the 14th Driehaus Prize laureate, will be awarded the $200,000 prize and a bronze miniature of the Choregic Monument of Lysikrates during a ceremony on March 19 (Saturday) in Chicago. In conjunction with the Driehaus Prize, Eusebio Leal Spengler, city historian of Havana, Cuba, will receive the $50,000 Henry Hope Reed Award.

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Mark McKenna appeals to Supreme Court in Apple v. Samsung dispute

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Mark P. McKenna, professor of law and associate dean for faculty development in the Notre Dame Law School, is among the leaders of a group of 37 law professors who filed a friend-of-the-court brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the Apple v. Samsung case, in which Samsung has appealed its patent loss to Apple in a lower federal circuit court dispute over the copying of iPhone technology.

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Can performance brands cause a placebo effect?

Author: William G. Gilroy

From the middle-school child considering the premier brands of soccer shoes to the college graduate weighing which graduate test prep course to take, a common marketing message from consumer brands is “you will perform better with us.” In a new study, Frank Germann, assistant professor of marketing at Notre Dame, and colleagues from the University of Kentucky and Penn State University examine if such performance brands can cause a placebo effect.

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Newly discovered star offers opportunity to explore origins of first stars sprung to life in early universe

Author: William G. Gilroy

A team of researchers, including Vinicius Placco, a research assistant professor at Notre Dame, has observed the brightest ultra metal-poor star, or UMP, ever discovered. The star is a rare relic from the Milky Way’s formative years. As such, it offers astronomers a precious opportunity to explore the first stars that sprung to life within our galaxy.

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Thomson Reuters names 5 Notre Dame faculty among the top 1 percent of highly cited scholars

Author: Nina Welding

Five Notre Dame faculty members—Bertrand Hochwald and J. Nicholas Laneman from the College of Engineering, Timothy Beers and Prashant Kamat from the College of Science, and Luis Gómez-Mejia from the Mendoza College of Business—have been named to the 2015 Thomson Reuters’ Highly Cited Researchers list.

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Historian: “The Revenant” is part make-believe, part historic art

Author: Brittany Collins

“The Revenant,” a movie nominated for 12 Oscars including for best picture and best actor, is a film inspired by the true story of mountain man Hugh Glass. Jon T. Coleman, professor of history at Notre Dame and author of “Here Lies Hugh Glass: A Mountain Man, A Bear, and the Rise of the American Nation,” praised the movie’s beauty, ambition and creativity with its source material.

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Spider web research shows promise for noninvasive genetic sampling

Author: Marissa Gebhard and Brittany Collins

Using web samples from black widow spiders fed with crickets, researchers at Notre Dame have successfully used DNA samples to identify both the spider and the species of its prey. Such noninvasive sampling to obtain genetic information could have practical implications in several fields including conservation research and pest management.

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Richard Garnett joins friend of the court brief in Supreme Court’s Little Sisters of the Poor case

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Richard Garnett, Paul J. Schierl/Fort Howard Corporation Professor of Law at Notre Dame, has joined 15 other constitutional scholars in filing an amicus curiae brief in the U.S. Supreme Court’s Little Sisters of the Poor v. Burwell case. The case will determine whether the Little Sisters of the Poor and similar ministries can be forced to comply with the contraceptive mandate of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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A global celebration of the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death and legacy

Author: Notre Dame News

Shakespeare at Notre Dame has kicked off “SHAKESPEARE: 1616-2016,” a yearlong series of performances, conferences and special events commemorating the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death and his legacy. “Act One” of the celebration includes events slated during the University of Notre Dame’s spring semester, which runs January through April.

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Law professor files brief with Supreme Court for families of dead in 1983 Marine barracks bombing in Lebanon

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Jimmy Gurulé, professor of law in the Notre Dame Law School, with six other law professors who teach and publish in the field of national security law, has filed an amici curiae, or friends of the court brief, on behalf of the families of the 241 U.S. servicemen killed in the 1983 truck-bombing attack on a Marine barracks in Beirut.

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Asian carp could cause some Lake Erie fish species to decline, others to increase

Author: Notre Dame News

If they successfully invade Lake Erie, Asian carp could eventually account for about a third of the total weight of fish in the lake and could cause declines in most fish species—including prized sport and commercial fish such as walleye, according to a new computer modeling study. However, most of the expected declines in Lake Erie will not be as extreme as some experts have predicted, according to the food-web study by Notre Dame’s David Lodge and colleagues from other American and Canadian research institutions.

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Alex Chávez: Parallels among Latino, Mideast and North African migration

Author: Gene Stowe

Alex E. Chávez, an assistant professor in anthropology and Fellow of the Institute for Latino Studies (ILS), sees parallels between longstanding Latino migration to the United States and the current crisis of Middle Eastern and North African migration to Europe. He was part of a group of ILS faculty fellows who met with Italian scholars to discuss immigration at Notre Dame’s Global Gateway Center in Rome in October.

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New technology to provide insights into the health of students

Author: William G. Gilroy

Studies show that nearly all college students own a cellphone, and most of those students use text messaging as their main form of communication. Researchers from Notre Dame used the centrality of cellphones in college students’ lives to delve deep into students’ usage habits and how their social networks affect their everyday lives.

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Physicists offer theories to explain mysterious collision at Large Hadron Collider

Author: Gene Stowe

Physicists around the world were puzzled recently when an unusual bump appeared in the signal of the Large Hadron Collider, causing them to wonder if it was a new particle previously unknown, or perhaps even two new particles. Adam Martin, assistant professor of physics at Notre Dame, said he and other theoretical physicists had heard about the results before they were released on Dec. 15, and groups began brainstorming about what the bump could mean if confirmed—a long shot, but an intriguing one.

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New democracy dataset to “revolutionize” democracy research

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

A five-year collaboration between institutions in the United States and Sweden has resulted in a new, public dataset for researchers of democracy. The first of its kind, the Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem) dataset has institutional homes at Notre Dame’s Kellogg Institute for International Studies and the V-Dem Institute in the Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

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