News » Archives » April 2016

Do successful leaders produce more successful leaders?

Author: William G. Gilroy

Craig Crossland, assistant professor of management in Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, and his colleagues studied the NFL to determine if the so-called “acolyte effect” that makes protégés of successful head coaches successful in turn is real. They tracked the career outcomes of almost 1,300 coaches over 30 years.

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Guggenheim Foundation awards fellowships to two Arts and Letters professors

Author: Brian Wallheimer

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has awarded two of its prestigious 2016 fellowships to faculty in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters. The fellowships, which fund a diverse group of scholars, artists and scientists, will go to Anjan Chakravartty, a professor in the Department of Philosophy, and Stephen Fallon, the Rev. John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities in the Program of Liberal Studies and the Department of English.

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Researchers begin high-tech study of Vatican courtyard

Author: Public Affairs & Communication

Vatican City, both the smallest sovereign state in the world and the administrative headquarters of its largest Christian Church, is also a United Nations World Heritage site. Among the series of architectural restoration projects planned or under way there, few are more significant than that of the Cortile del Belvedere, or Belvedere Courtyard, where a team of Notre Dame faculty and graduate students from the University’s School of Architecture and Department of Physics have begun an unprecedented study.

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Professor launches project to advance scientific and theological literacy among madrasa graduates in India

Author: Joan Fallon

With a $1.2 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation, Ebrahim Moosa, professor of Islamic studies at Notre Dame, has launched a three-year project to enrich scientific and theological literacy among recent graduates of Islamic seminaries in India.

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Notre Dame and Vatican Library to celebrate new collaboration

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Notre Dame and the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, or Vatican Library, will formalize a unique agreement of collaboration and exchange in a ceremony at 12:30 p.m. May 9 (Monday) in the Hesburgh Room of the Morris Inn, where Notre Dame President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., and Archbishop Jean-Louis Bruguès, O.P., archivist and librarian of the Holy Roman Church, will sign a memorandum of understanding.

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Columbia University dean appointed vice president and associate provost for internationalization

Author: Paul Browne

Michael E. Pippenger, Columbia University’s dean of undergraduate global programs and assistant vice president for international education, has been appointed vice president and associate provost for internationalization at Notre Dame. He succeeds J. Nicholas Entrikin, the inaugural occupant of the post, who will retire this summer.

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Cancer treatment system wins 2016 McCloskey Business Plan Competition

Author: Carol Elliott

A novel platform for delivering cancer treatment drugs was the grand prizewinner of the 16th Annual McCloskey Business Plan Competition, an annual competition sponsored by Notre Dame’s Gigot Center for Entrepreneurship. The winning team, Certus Therapeutics, was made up of five Notre Dame graduate students representing four academic programs.

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Juniors Caleb Pine and Christa Grace Watkins named 2016 Truman Scholars

Author: Carrie Gates

Two juniors in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, Caleb “C.J.” Pine and Christa Grace Watkins, have been named 2016 Truman Scholars. Just 54 college juniors have been selected as Truman Scholars this year, based on leadership potential, intellectual ability, and a commitment to public service. The winners were chosen from 775 candidates nominated by 305 colleges and universities nationwide—a record number of applications and institutions.

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A tough childhood can lead to a shorter life for baboons

Author: Notre Dame News

What is true for humans is also true for baboons: The tougher the childhood, the higher the risks of premature death later in life. Numerous studies have shown that childhood trauma can have far-reaching effects on adult health and survival; new research from Notre Dame, Duke University and Princeton University finds the same is true for wild baboons.

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Historian George Marsden elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Author: Michael O. Garvey

George Marsden, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History emeritus at Notre Dame, has been elected a member of the 2016 class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He will be formally inducted at a ceremony at the American Academy’s headquarters Oct. 8 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Jennifer Tank receives 2016 Ganey Award for community-based research

Author: JP Shortall

Jennifer Tank has received the 2016 Rodney F. Ganey, Ph.D., Community-Based Research Award for working together with Kosciusko County farmers and local conservation staff to reduce nutrient runoff in the Shatto Ditch watershed. The award is a $5,000 prize presented annually to a regular faculty member at Notre Dame who has completed at least one research project that addresses a need within South Bend or the surrounding area.

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New anti-inversion rules should reduce but not eliminate incentives to invert

Author: Carol Elliott

Corporate tax expert James Seida, associate accountancy professor at Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, says the new U.S. Treasury rules issued April 4 will limit inversion activity but ultimately fail to address the fundamental reason companies use to justify inversions.

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Junior faculty receive nationally competitive research awards

Author: Brandi Klingerman

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has recognized six Notre Dame faculty from the Colleges of Engineering and Science for their accomplishments in research with an Early Career Development (CAREER) Award. The CAREER program was established in 1995 and is the NSF’s most prestigious recognition given to junior faculty.

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Faculty comment on Pope Francis’ letter, “Amoris Laetitia”

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Pope Francis released his apostolic exhortation “Amoris Laetitia” (“The Joy of Love”) in Rome April 8. The document addresses such areas of Catholic Church doctrine as the admission of divorced and remarried Catholics to the sacrament of the Eucharist, same-sex relationships and cohabitation. Here is what some people on the Notre Dame faculty are saying and thinking about “Amoris Laetitia.”

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Pamela Nolan Young named director for academic diversity and inclusion

Author: Sue Lister

Pamela Nolan Young has been appointed to the newly created role of director for academic diversity and inclusion at Notre Dame. Young, who received her juris doctor degree from the Notre Dame Law School, brings more than 25 years of experience to the University in the areas of diversity and inclusion, equal opportunity, education and law.

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Astrophysicists find triple star system with “hot Jupiter”

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Crisp, clear images of a “hot Jupiter” system captured by a Notre Dame physicist were vital in determining that a newly found planet inhabits a three-star system, a phenomenon documented only a few times before. Justin R. Crepp, Freimann Assistant Professor of Physics, was part of the team that discovered KELT-4Ab, a so-called “hot Jupiter” because it is a gas giant that orbits extremely close to one of the stars in its solar system.

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Renowned microbiologist Rita Colwell to receive Notre Dame honorary degree

Author: Sue Lister

Rita Colwell, a molecular microbiologist whose research focuses on global infectious diseases, water and health, will receive a doctor of science honorary degree at Notre Dame’s 171st University Commencement Ceremony on May 15 (Sunday). She joins six previously announced honorary degree recipients.

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Notre Dame physicists discover rare brown dwarf, essential for testing theoretical models

Author: Gene Stowe

A team led by Justin Crepp, the Frank M. Freimann Assistant Professor of Physics at Notre Dame, has discovered a rare brown dwarf, a faint object with properties in between that of a star and planet. In addition to taking its picture for the first time, Crepp’s team also determined the brown dwarf’s mass, age and composition—essential information that can be used to “benchmark” the study of these elusive objects.

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With mosquito Y chromosome sequencing, researchers lay groundwork for advanced disease control

Author: Sarah Craig

Nora J. Besansky, O’Hara Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and member of the Eck Institute for Global Health at Notre Dame, assembled a diverse and multinational team of scientists to crack the genetic code of the Y chromosome in malaria mosquitoes for the first time.

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Unearthing the secrets of a star

Author: Andy Fuller and William Gilroy

Copernicus. Galileo. Hubble. For ages, humans have looked up at the night sky to ponder the secrets of the universe. The flickering stars have been the stuff of fascination and research for millennia, from men and women who mostly turned their gaze ever upward to study the vastness of space. Yet today, a group of Notre Dame astrophysicists is going down—way down—in a new attempt to gain an understanding of the evolution of stars.

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Continuing the search for gravitational waves

Author: William G. Gilroy

In February, the LIGO Scientific Collaboration announced it had detected gravitational waves for the first time, confirming the last prediction of Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity. Somewhat overlooked in the excitement that followed is the fact that scientists don’t know the exact location the waves were coming from. Notre Dame astronomer Peter Garnavich is leading a group of researchers who are hoping to more precisely locate where future gravitational waves originate.

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Notre Dame to host world premiere opera adaptation of Shakespeare’s “As You Like It”

Author: Josh Weinhold

For the first time ever, Notre Dame will host the world premiere of an opera: a commissioned production of “As You Like It,” the classic Shakespearean comedy. The four-show run is a highlight of “Shakespeare: 1616-2016,” a yearlong series of campus events commemorating the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. The opera features two casts, composed primarily of Notre Dame and Indiana University South Bend students.

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Market reactions to sudden CEO deaths highlight CEOs’ importance

Author: William G. Gilroy

When Tootsie Roll chairman and CEO Melvin Gordon died unexpectedly on Jan. 20, 2015, the firm’s value saw an immediate 7 percent increase, which was equivalent to about $140 million. Craig Crossland, an assistant professor of management at Notre Dame, and his research colleagues examined 240 sudden and unexpected CEO deaths like Gordon’s to determine how shareholders’ perceptions of CEO significance have changed over time.

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