Spring 2019 Inclusive Excellence Workshops

Inclusive Excellence

The events on this page are part of a broader lineup of workshops on Inclusive Excellence taking place throughout the spring 2019 semester and beyond.

Attendance is free and open to all members of the Notre Dame community, but advance registration is required. Descriptions of each of the three workshops, including links to register, are included below.

*Note: The Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning regularly offers workshops related to Inclusive Excellence, as well. For more information about upcoming opportunities, please visit the Kaneb Center website.

“Understanding the Dynamics of Marginalized Students”

Monday, February 11, 2019
3:00-4:30 PM, McKenna Hall

Participants in this workshop will gain greater understanding of the underrepresented student experience in classes, learn to uncover implicit biases and to recognize microaggressions that faculty and students may exhibit, and discuss strategies to respond.

Presented by:

Register to attend

“Military 101 Workshop”

Tuesday, March 5, 2019
3:00-4:30 PM, McKenna Hall

Student veterans represent a growing population on campus and are diverse in terms of demographic characteristics and service backgrounds. These students add great value because they bring global experiences, leadership skills, discipline, and focus to the classroom. However, most veterans are entering college for the first time or returning after many years away. The purpose of this workshop is to educate faculty, staff, and students about the unique strengths and challenges facing student veterans and military service members.

Presented by:

  • Regan Jones, Director for Military and Veterans Affairs

Register to attend

“Raciolinguistics”

Monday, April 8, 2019
3:00-4:30 PM, McKenna Hall

This session examines the intersections of language and identity. Drawing on recent work in raciolinguistics—the realm of linguistics which serves to answer the question “What does it mean to speak as a racialized subject in contemporary America?”—the interactive workshop asks participants to consider their own language stories and how language has shaped who they are and to what extent language repertoires inform perceived or real inclusion/exclusion in the speaking communities in which we participate. Looking outward to the students we teach, in what ways are we fully inclusive to the range of Englishes and/or translanguage practices among our student body?

Presented by:

Register to attend